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Posts tagged capcom.

Resident Evil Revelations 2 Teaser Creeping with Secrets

The cerberus is out of the bag: Revelations 2 is in the works for Xbox 360, Xbox One, PS3, and PS4. In true teaser fashion, we don’t have much to go on in terms of information about the sequel, but Capcom promises fans with a keen eye will be able to spot some — God help me — revelations while watching the video above.

I caught at least one that’ll cause longtime vets to go Crimson Head; namely, a person sporting a TerraSave t-shirt during a cocktail party right before things take a turn for the Romero. Don’t recall the name? In series lore, TerraSave a is human rights organization that specifically focuses on bioterrorism relief and prevention. In 2008’s animated film Resident Evil: Degeneration, long-absent heroine Claire Redfield is a prominent figurehead in the group.

Could Claire be finally, finally returning to the survival horror fold? I sure as shit hope so. She had the dual role of both being my childhood hero and childhood crush. Who cares if I could count her polygons on my hands in RE2? She was a stone cold cutie.

The original Revelations was Capcom’s best attempt at marrying the old school scares that put the series on the map with the frantic action introduced in RE4 that propelled the games into the mainstream. I can’t wait to see if Capcom can continue to successfully pull off that bloody balancing act.

+ Sony’s Fall conference confirms behind closed doors that Resident Evil: Revelations 2 is happening and it’s happening to next-gen; PS4 version slated for early 2015, son!
Capcom’s set to roll out a bigger reveal at this year’s Tokyo Game Show. Now, say it with me: “Please feature Claire. Please feature Claire…”

Sony’s Fall conference confirms behind closed doors that Resident Evil: Revelations 2 is happening and it’s happening to next-gen; PS4 version slated for early 2015, son!

Capcom’s set to roll out a bigger reveal at this year’s Tokyo Game Show. Now, say it with me: “Please feature Claire. Please feature Claire…”

+ Resident Evil Revelations 2 Leaked By Xbox; Features Spooky Prison Setting
How friggin’ joyous. I get to report on Resident Evil news twice in the same month? It’s not every day your reason for being is fulfilled… I may have revealed too much about myself, sure. Let’s pretend tattered RE posters from old Prima guides aren’t adorning every wall in my apartment and move on to the haps.
Gamer in a Box, France’s best worst named gaming site, caught wise to Xbox.com hosting two interestin’ images — one being the concept art above of a prison fallen into disrepair and the following:

Though I’ve no formal training in investigative reporting, I’d still caution a guess that the box art shown is an extremely subtle clue Capcom is planning on sequelizing the well-received Resident Evil Revelations.
I know. This whole “Biohazard" business can be confusing. That’s actually the original Japanese name given to the series. It was changed for North American release to Resident Evil in order to protect the intellectual rights of this band. If it weren’t for nu-metal, Resident Evil might have a title that didn’t stop making sense after the first game. This fun sidebar on nu-metal making the world a slightly worse place was provided to by the complete lack of solid information I have to give to you guys.
Revelations 2 rumors kicked up earlier in the year featuring too-fuckin’-good-to-be-true details like the return of Claire Redfield. More recently, new rumblings suggested that, though the spin-off began its life on the 3DS, the sequel would only appear on Xbox 360 and PS3 as well as the PS4 and Xbone.
Cat’s outta of the bag now. Just a matter of time before we get to see what Capcom’s up to.

Resident Evil Revelations 2 Leaked By Xbox; Features Spooky Prison Setting

How friggin’ joyous. I get to report on Resident Evil news twice in the same month? It’s not every day your reason for being is fulfilled… I may have revealed too much about myself, sure. Let’s pretend tattered RE posters from old Prima guides aren’t adorning every wall in my apartment and move on to the haps.

Gamer in a Box, France’s best worst named gaming site, caught wise to Xbox.com hosting two interestin’ images — one being the concept art above of a prison fallen into disrepair and the following:

Though I’ve no formal training in investigative reporting, I’d still caution a guess that the box art shown is an extremely subtle clue Capcom is planning on sequelizing the well-received Resident Evil Revelations.

I know. This whole “Biohazard" business can be confusing. That’s actually the original Japanese name given to the series. It was changed for North American release to Resident Evil in order to protect the intellectual rights of this band. If it weren’t for nu-metal, Resident Evil might have a title that didn’t stop making sense after the first game. This fun sidebar on nu-metal making the world a slightly worse place was provided to by the complete lack of solid information I have to give to you guys.

Revelations 2 rumors kicked up earlier in the year featuring too-fuckin’-good-to-be-true details like the return of Claire Redfield. More recently, new rumblings suggested that, though the spin-off began its life on the 3DS, the sequel would only appear on Xbox 360 and PS3 as well as the PS4 and Xbone.

Cat’s outta of the bag now. Just a matter of time before we get to see what Capcom’s up to.

Resident Evil's Sublime Remake is Being Revived for Current and Next-Gen

In 2002, the Nintendo Gamecube of all systems saw a resurrected and reconfigured version of one the greatest titles that helped define the survival horror genre.

Rather than stray away from the core values of the ‘96 classic, this new Resident Evil improved upon them — the game was made grislier, the atmosphere was darker, and the difficulty was even harder than the original. If you wanted to experience the S.T.A.R.S. team’s first disastrous mission, REmake (the name fans coined) quickly became the preferred vessel to do so. Despite this, it didn’t sell worth a shit stuck on Nintendo’s purple purse.

Now, Capcom has revived the underrated classic for the HD generation. Set for release in early 2015 as a digital download, this ragged chunk of RE history will be made available on PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, and Xbox One. The game’s visuals — from our hapless heroes to the dilapidated Spencer Estate — have been bolstered by an upgraded resolution and 3D models. The game even runs at 1080p on next-gen systems.

The creaking wood floors, the skin-crawling soundtrack, and the bone-crunching noise that comes along with making Jill Sandwiches are all retouched in 5.1 Surround Sound. The game can be played in the original 4:3 aspect ratio or enjoyed in a brand new widescreen mode (flat-screens were less common in 2002, if you recall).

The series famous tank controls return as a default, and you can bet your ass I’ll struggle through them like a champion, but if you bewilderingly dislike fighting the controller you’ll be glad to know a new “Push To Go” control scheme is being implemented. You can toggle between both during gameplay in case you youngin’s want to see how hard us old men had it back in the day.

+ Legendary Producing Dead Rising Movie for Crackle
Capcom’s carnage caked open-world zombie series is making the jump to the silver screen — just not the big one.
Legendary Pictures’ digital division is producing an adaptation of Dead Rising set to premiere on Crackle. After Crackle’s exclusivity run ends, the film will release via DVD, SVOD, TV, and VOD, available as a feature-length or broken up into episodic format (which… worries me, though I can’t quite figure out where this well of doubt finds water).
Working from a script by Tim Carter (who wrote 2012’s stupidly underrated Sleeping Dogs) and from the production company that put together the Mortal Kombat: Legacy web-series, the narrative follows four hapless mains navigating through a wide-scale zombie outbreak while searching for the focal point of infection.
Several ingredients from the games make their way into the story including a (worthless) vaccine meant to stave off infection, government conspiracy, and the media’s eye on the apocalypse. It’s uncertain if the series’ signature taste for madness — which runs anywhere between ridiculous DIY weapons of slaughter and main characters crowd-surfing zombies in speedos — will find its way into the adaptation. But, really, why the hell adapt Dead Rising if you’re going to zap the fun out of it?
No date is in place for the film just yet.

Legendary Producing Dead Rising Movie for Crackle

Capcom’s carnage caked open-world zombie series is making the jump to the silver screen — just not the big one.

Legendary Pictures’ digital division is producing an adaptation of Dead Rising set to premiere on Crackle. After Crackle’s exclusivity run ends, the film will release via DVD, SVOD, TV, and VOD, available as a feature-length or broken up into episodic format (which… worries me, though I can’t quite figure out where this well of doubt finds water).

Working from a script by Tim Carter (who wrote 2012’s stupidly underrated Sleeping Dogs) and from the production company that put together the Mortal Kombat: Legacy web-series, the narrative follows four hapless mains navigating through a wide-scale zombie outbreak while searching for the focal point of infection.

Several ingredients from the games make their way into the story including a (worthless) vaccine meant to stave off infection, government conspiracy, and the media’s eye on the apocalypse. It’s uncertain if the series’ signature taste for madness — which runs anywhere between ridiculous DIY weapons of slaughter and main characters crowd-surfing zombies in speedos — will find its way into the adaptation. But, really, why the hell adapt Dead Rising if you’re going to zap the fun out of it?

No date is in place for the film just yet.

+ Will Capcom Announce a Dino Crisis Reboot This Year?
This old rumor kicks up every so often. Historically, it’s amounted to nothing. In fact, Capcom smacked down one such rumor just last year, stating that they’re focusing their attention on creating new IP’s (this statement was presumably made in front of a gigantic Street Fighter IV AE Turbo Ultimate Mix poster).
Here’s 2014’s obligatory rumor: According to the latest issue of Official Xbox Magazine UK, Capcom is headlong into production on a Dino Crisis reboot — a series thought extinct since 2003. What’s more is we’ll supposedly see a world debut at this year’s E3. Those slim details are all we have to go on, but Europe’s journalists have been running with it.
Given past disappointments, I’d keep your hopes grounded. There’s really not much to go on here. Why report it, you ask? Because I, and the rest of the free world that grew up in Spielberg’s CG dinosaur populated ‘90’s, really frickin’ want a new Dino Crisis game.
Again, tether those hopes, but I do happen to recall Capcom mentioning they would be reviving a classic IP this year… Dammit, my hopes got off the ground. Excuse me; I have to go shoot them down.

Will Capcom Announce a Dino Crisis Reboot This Year?

This old rumor kicks up every so often. Historically, it’s amounted to nothing. In fact, Capcom smacked down one such rumor just last year, stating that they’re focusing their attention on creating new IP’s (this statement was presumably made in front of a gigantic Street Fighter IV AE Turbo Ultimate Mix poster).

Here’s 2014’s obligatory rumor: According to the latest issue of Official Xbox Magazine UK, Capcom is headlong into production on a Dino Crisis reboot — a series thought extinct since 2003. What’s more is we’ll supposedly see a world debut at this year’s E3. Those slim details are all we have to go on, but Europe’s journalists have been running with it.

Given past disappointments, I’d keep your hopes grounded. There’s really not much to go on here. Why report it, you ask? Because I, and the rest of the free world that grew up in Spielberg’s CG dinosaur populated ‘90’s, really frickin’ want a new Dino Crisis game.

Again, tether those hopes, but I do happen to recall Capcom mentioning they would be reviving a classic IP this year… Dammit, my hopes got off the ground. Excuse me; I have to go shoot them down.

Red Herb Review: Strider

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I’ll come clean; I don’t know much about Strider. My familiarity with the character begins and ends at his inclusion to the rosters of Capcom’s Vs. titles. I’d always confuse him for Shinobi, if we’re being perfectly honest. Can you blame me? Not that there were many chances for me to get acquainted with Strider Hiryu before now. The last installment came out fourteen years ago.

But a crash course on the series isn’t needed with admission. Whether you’re fresh to the series, such as myself, or if you’re reuniting with Hiryu once again, it won’t stop you from enjoying this fast-paced, satisfying — if not filling — slice of side-scrolling Metroidvania action.

Continue reading...

I want to voice Mega Man, so I’m sending in this audition tape to Capcom.

Strider Releases This Month

Double Helix and Capcom’s downloadable reboot of Strider, the classic tale of a man and his violent hatred of things that stop him from moving on one side of the screen to the other, comes out this February.

PS3 and PS4 users can find Mr. Hiryu on PSN Feb. 18th, while both Xbox versions (current-gen and next-gen) as well as the PC release can be purchased Feb. 19th. The retro revival will cost you $14.99.

Two new modes make the cut, too, including “Beacon Run” — where you’ll make speed runs across levels while dicing foes — and “Survival Mode” — in which waves of enemies barrel your way as you utilize an assortment of weapons and items to end them.

More than that, it’s been revealed that you can locate alternate costumes throughout the game, giving you access to new customization options. You’re morbidly peeling these clothes off of dead Striders, but the cost of fashion has always been high.

+ Fan Project Resurrects Resident Evil: Outbreak's Dead Online
Sometimes I have to marvel at fans’ tenacity.
Though marching toward a full decade since its release two whole console generations ago on the PS2 — the Former Champion of the World, as you may well remember — fans of the highly experimental and hopelessly ahead of its time spin-off, Resident Evil: Outbreak, are not content to let the dead lie.
If you don’t recall this obscurity, Outbreak File #1 and its “sequel”/expansion File #2 took the traditional, fixed-perspective scares of the pre-Resi 4 titles and created a scenario-based, cooperatively online game — Resident Evil's first foray into the online space.
Outbreak featured a bunch of cool ideas that you know Capcom’s teams have been wanting to toss into the games for years. Pitting you and a handful of other survivors in the ongoing ruination of Raccoon City, the game was a meaner, more survivalist focused experience that forced item management, combat tactics, and even environmental defense onto your group lest you all faced the business end of a horrible, T-Virus induced death. Fight alone and you die alone.
The series did not persist. A number of staggering design flaws made sure Outbreak would begin and end at cult status (without the PS2’s HDD the game didn’t just have loading times, it had goddamn loading eras). This wasn’t helped by Sony’s admirable but lackluster first try at console-only online.
The servers, of course, have long been shut down. But one group of survival horror activists said, “To fuck with that noise.” Enter the Outbreak Server Recreation Project. Through the magic of the project’s custom servers, you’re able to actually play online with both File #1 and File #2… if you own the Japanese versions of the games, that is (emulators also work, but aren’t condoned by the group, mind you).
If you’re like me, Operation Raccoon City didn’t scratch that Outbreak itch (personally, it just bruised the area around the itch, then pissed on it… to heal the bruising?). Perhaps this attention, albeit small, may plant the notion in a Capcom exec’s head to kick around the Outbreak IP once more. Imagine what today’s tech could do with this concept. With the popularity of similarly themed games like DayZ and State of Decay, a modern day restart of Outbreak starts to click.
Ah, wishful thinking. We may have to settle for our nostalgia. But at least you can take that nostalgia online again.

Fan Project Resurrects Resident Evil: Outbreak's Dead Online

Sometimes I have to marvel at fans’ tenacity.

Though marching toward a full decade since its release two whole console generations ago on the PS2 — the Former Champion of the World, as you may well remember — fans of the highly experimental and hopelessly ahead of its time spin-off, Resident Evil: Outbreak, are not content to let the dead lie.

If you don’t recall this obscurity, Outbreak File #1 and its “sequel”/expansion File #2 took the traditional, fixed-perspective scares of the pre-Resi 4 titles and created a scenario-based, cooperatively online game — Resident Evil's first foray into the online space.

Outbreak featured a bunch of cool ideas that you know Capcom’s teams have been wanting to toss into the games for years. Pitting you and a handful of other survivors in the ongoing ruination of Raccoon City, the game was a meaner, more survivalist focused experience that forced item management, combat tactics, and even environmental defense onto your group lest you all faced the business end of a horrible, T-Virus induced death. Fight alone and you die alone.

The series did not persist. A number of staggering design flaws made sure Outbreak would begin and end at cult status (without the PS2’s HDD the game didn’t just have loading times, it had goddamn loading eras). This wasn’t helped by Sony’s admirable but lackluster first try at console-only online.

The servers, of course, have long been shut down. But one group of survival horror activists said, “To fuck with that noise.” Enter the Outbreak Server Recreation Project. Through the magic of the project’s custom servers, you’re able to actually play online with both File #1 and File #2… if you own the Japanese versions of the games, that is (emulators also work, but aren’t condoned by the group, mind you).

If you’re like me, Operation Raccoon City didn’t scratch that Outbreak itch (personally, it just bruised the area around the itch, then pissed on it… to heal the bruising?). Perhaps this attention, albeit small, may plant the notion in a Capcom exec’s head to kick around the Outbreak IP once more. Imagine what today’s tech could do with this concept. With the popularity of similarly themed games like DayZ and State of Decay, a modern day restart of Outbreak starts to click.

Ah, wishful thinking. We may have to settle for our nostalgia. But at least you can take that nostalgia online again.

+ Shit! Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 and MvC2 are Being Pulled From PSN/XBLA
Thanks to the cruel deadline beset upon the publishing rights to these titles, two of Capcom’s licensed, fightin’ crossover hits are being pulled from Xbox Live and PSN.
Both Marvel vs. Capcom 2 and version 2.0 of its years estranged sequel, Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3, are being yoinked from digital distribution… very soon. The post on Capcom Unity isn’t all too clear on when exactly, but it does have dates for when the newer title’s plethora of alternate costumes is being axed. [Update: Both game are being delisted Dec. 17th on PSN; Dec. 26th on XBL.]
On PSN, Dec. 17th is the final day you can purchase DLC — which is being discounted by 50% — while downloadable doomsday arrives for the content on XBLA come Dec. 26th. Capcom says hold your breath for news on potential price drops for XBLA.
While both MvC2 and UMvC3 remain at their full $14.99 and $29.99 price tags on Xbox respectively, PSN has at least deflated the former, spritier fighter’s cost to just $7.49. Have PS Plus? Even better; the game is only $3.75. I wasted that in quarters within fifteen minutes back in its arcade days (I was, and am still, terrible at the fucking game… but I love it).
[image via]

Shit! Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 and MvC2 are Being Pulled From PSN/XBLA

Thanks to the cruel deadline beset upon the publishing rights to these titles, two of Capcom’s licensed, fightin’ crossover hits are being pulled from Xbox Live and PSN.

Both Marvel vs. Capcom 2 and version 2.0 of its years estranged sequel, Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3, are being yoinked from digital distribution… very soon. The post on Capcom Unity isn’t all too clear on when exactly, but it does have dates for when the newer title’s plethora of alternate costumes is being axed. [Update: Both game are being delisted Dec. 17th on PSN; Dec. 26th on XBL.]

On PSN, Dec. 17th is the final day you can purchase DLC — which is being discounted by 50% — while downloadable doomsday arrives for the content on XBLA come Dec. 26th. Capcom says hold your breath for news on potential price drops for XBLA.

While both MvC2 and UMvC3 remain at their full $14.99 and $29.99 price tags on Xbox respectively, PSN has at least deflated the former, spritier fighter’s cost to just $7.49. Have PS Plus? Even better; the game is only $3.75. I wasted that in quarters within fifteen minutes back in its arcade days (I was, and am still, terrible at the fucking game… but I love it).

[image via]

"Hadouken Cabs"…? What the Hell Is Sony Up To?

Sony’s been dropping this odd viral caveat off at different gaming junkets, and I’m just damned stumped trying to figure what it’s really for.

The mock ad features “Hadouken Cabs,” a taxi company that’s apparently been “knocking the competition out since 1987.” The 30 second spot is, obviously, filled to the brim with Street Fighter references, an allusion to the original PlayStation’s launch year, and a blink-and-you’ll-miss-it flash of the DualShock 4.

What in the hell is Sony — and, guilty by association, Capcom — teasing? Something Street Fighter; something PS4. Well, it must be that the upcoming re-re-re-release Ultra Street Fighter IV is also on its way to the next-gen…

Except Capcom’s own Yoshinori Ono, the man who perpetually carries Blanka in his pocket, says there aren’t enough resources to port Ultra to the next-gen. Maybe Ono’s being sly. But would this face lie to you?

That can only mean, then, that Street Fighter V is a PlayStation 4 exclusive!

Except… Producer Tomoaki Ayano very recently stated SFV likely won’t be ready for the public until 20-goddamn-18. Like a dodged hadouken, that dream flies off-screen.

Unless a Mishima Airlines commercial is uploaded next week, this ad alone doesn’t point too firmly to Tekken X Street Fighter, which has been suspiciously quiet for suspiciously long. The mystery stands and we’re left to anxiously ponder. Which is exactly what they want, man.

+ Capcom’s 30th Anniversary PSN Sale: Games 50 - 65% Off
My love for Capcom may often be… tested. For every time they burn me, I have to remind myself of good times we spent together. Maybe that friction is what makes our relationship work, though? It keeps the intrigue well in place. I mean, the sexual attraction plays a big part of it, too, that’s for sure, but— You know what? I’ve revealed too much.
Capcom’s gotten through 30 whole years of “hadokens” and that pained expression Mega Man makes when he’s vaporized. To celebrate — the 30 years, I mean, not the Blue Bomber’s death grimace — PlayStation loyalists can score some wicked deals on a selection of digital games on PSN. Here they be (PS Plus discounts are denoted by the +):

Bionic Commando Rearmed 2 - $4.99 / $3.49+
Capcom Arcade Cabinet All-In Pack - $14.99 / $10.49+  
Devil May Cry HD Collection - $14.99 / $10.49+
Dungeons & Dragons: Chronicles of Mystara - $7.49 / $5.24+
Final Fight Double Impact - $4.99 / $3.49+
Okami HD - $9.99 / $6.99+
Remember Me - $19.99 / $13.99+
- Remember Me Combo Lab Pack - $1.99 / $1.39+
Resident Evil: Operation Raccoon City - $14.99 / $10.49+  
- REORC Echo Six Expansion Pack 1 - $ 4.99 / $3.49+
- REORC Echo Six Expansion Pack 2 - $4.99 / $3.49+
Street Fighter III: Third Strike Online Edition Complete Pack - $13.49 / $9.44+
Street Fighter X Tekken - $19.99 / $13.99+
SFxTK Additional Character Pack (12 Characters) $9.99 / $6.99+
- SFxTK - Swap costume complete pack - $8.99 / $6.29+
- SFxTK - Alternate costume complete pack - $8.99 / $6.29+
Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix - $8.99 / $6.29+
Super Street Fighter IV Arcade Edition - $14.99 / $10.49+

Sakes alive; some of these titles are cheaper than a pumpkin spice latte. And, like that sugary brew you enjoy singeing your gullet with, this sale is only available for a limited time — with all deals ending October 21st.

Capcom’s 30th Anniversary PSN Sale: Games 50 - 65% Off

My love for Capcom may often be… tested. For every time they burn me, I have to remind myself of good times we spent together. Maybe that friction is what makes our relationship work, though? It keeps the intrigue well in place. I mean, the sexual attraction plays a big part of it, too, that’s for sure, but— You know what? I’ve revealed too much.

Capcom’s gotten through 30 whole years of “hadokens” and that pained expression Mega Man makes when he’s vaporized. To celebrate — the 30 years, I mean, not the Blue Bomber’s death grimace — PlayStation loyalists can score some wicked deals on a selection of digital games on PSN. Here they be (PS Plus discounts are denoted by the +):

Bionic Commando Rearmed 2 - $4.99 / $3.49+

Capcom Arcade Cabinet All-In Pack - $14.99 / $10.49+  

Devil May Cry HD Collection - $14.99 / $10.49+

Dungeons & Dragons: Chronicles of Mystara - $7.49 / $5.24+

Final Fight Double Impact - $4.99 / $3.49+

Okami HD - $9.99 / $6.99+

Remember Me - $19.99 / $13.99+

Remember Me Combo Lab Pack - $1.99 / $1.39+

Resident Evil: Operation Raccoon City - $14.99 / $10.49+  

- REORC Echo Six Expansion Pack 1 - $ 4.99 / $3.49+

- REORC Echo Six Expansion Pack 2 - $4.99 / $3.49+

Street Fighter III: Third Strike Online Edition Complete Pack - $13.49 / $9.44+

Street Fighter X Tekken - $19.99 / $13.99+

SFxTK Additional Character Pack (12 Characters) $9.99 / $6.99+

- SFxTK - Swap costume complete pack - $8.99 / $6.29+

- SFxTK - Alternate costume complete pack - $8.99 / $6.29+

Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix - $8.99 / $6.29+

Super Street Fighter IV Arcade Edition - $14.99 / $10.49+

Sakes alive; some of these titles are cheaper than a pumpkin spice latte. And, like that sugary brew you enjoy singeing your gullet with, this sale is only available for a limited time — with all deals ending October 21st.

+ Resident Evil Remake’s Poor Sales Upped the Action in RE4
Survival horror just ain’t what it used to be. In Resident Evil's case — in which its modern titles each and all feature robust amounts of gunplay and even martial arts action (you'd slap me if I told you that during the PS1 era) — a marked shift away from its survival horror roots can be traced back to one pivotal turning point in the franchise's history.
Series mastermind Shinji Mikami recalls that it was the 2002 Resident Evil remake’s financial failure that goaded him to turn Resident Evil 4 into Die Hard with parasitic, pitchfork-wielding villagers. I understand; I was befuddled by this news, too. The game was lauded as a critical success, after all. But Capcom’s exclusivity deal that locked REmake onto the Gamecube (and, years later, the Wii) might go a long way in explaining the disparity.
"The Resident Evil remake is one of my favorites of the series too,” said Mikami in an interview with IGN initially about a totally different game (The Evil Within). “But it didn’t sell very well. Maybe there weren’t many people ready to accept that. Because of the reaction to the Resident Evil remake, I decided to work more action into Resident Evil 4.”
Had the remake sold well, RE4 would have been a scarier, more horror driven game says Mikami. “With Resident Evil 1, 2, 3, and all the rest of the series beforeResident Evil 4, I was always saying to the staff, ‘Scaring the player is the number one thing.’ But for the first time, in Resident Evil 4, I told the team that fun gameplay is the most important thing… That all came out of the commercial failure of the Resident Evil remake.”
Even after all these years, Shinji is still burned about RE4's dominance overREmake. “And then of course Resident Evil 4 sold really well. I have kind of a lingering trauma there, because the Resident Evil remake didn’t sell — much more than people would think.”
My, my, our RE creators are having themselves a walk down memory lane as of late. Not too long ago, Hideki Kamiya was reflecting on how he very nearly ruined the hell out of Resident Evil 2 (the game was restarted from scratch at Mikami and team’s insistence even though the original build neared 60% completion). Can’t wait to hear in another decade just what the hell went awry with RE5 and 6. Keep an eye out for that article come 2023.

Resident Evil Remake’s Poor Sales Upped the Action in RE4

Survival horror just ain’t what it used to be. In Resident Evil's case — in which its modern titles each and all feature robust amounts of gunplay and even martial arts action (you'd slap me if I told you that during the PS1 era) — a marked shift away from its survival horror roots can be traced back to one pivotal turning point in the franchise's history.

Series mastermind Shinji Mikami recalls that it was the 2002 Resident Evil remake’s financial failure that goaded him to turn Resident Evil 4 into Die Hard with parasitic, pitchfork-wielding villagers. I understand; I was befuddled by this news, too. The game was lauded as a critical success, after all. But Capcom’s exclusivity deal that locked REmake onto the Gamecube (and, years later, the Wii) might go a long way in explaining the disparity.

"The Resident Evil remake is one of my favorites of the series too,” said Mikami in an interview with IGN initially about a totally different game (The Evil Within). “But it didn’t sell very well. Maybe there weren’t many people ready to accept that. Because of the reaction to the Resident Evil remake, I decided to work more action into Resident Evil 4.”

Had the remake sold well, RE4 would have been a scarier, more horror driven game says Mikami. “With Resident Evil 123, and all the rest of the series beforeResident Evil 4, I was always saying to the staff, ‘Scaring the player is the number one thing.’ But for the first time, in Resident Evil 4, I told the team that fun gameplay is the most important thing… That all came out of the commercial failure of the Resident Evil remake.”

Even after all these years, Shinji is still burned about RE4's dominance overREmake. “And then of course Resident Evil 4 sold really well. I have kind of a lingering trauma there, because the Resident Evil remake didn’t sell — much more than people would think.”

My, my, our RE creators are having themselves a walk down memory lane as of late. Not too long ago, Hideki Kamiya was reflecting on how he very nearly ruined the hell out of Resident Evil 2 (the game was restarted from scratch at Mikami and team’s insistence even though the original build neared 60% completion). Can’t wait to hear in another decade just what the hell went awry with RE5 and 6. Keep an eye out for that article come 2023.