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Posts tagged final fantasy.
+ gamefanatics:

Sends a strong message to Square for more Final Fantasy on PC…

"Everyone, scrap that VII remake. It’s obvious they’re scrambling for a XIII-4.”

gamefanatics:

Sends a strong message to Square for more Final Fantasy on PC…

"Everyone, scrap that VII remake. It’s obvious they’re scrambling for a XIII-4.”

+ Final Fantasy XV Still Exists, Trailer Reminds Us of the Pain of Not Owning It
Stop reading. Watch this.
You back? Your eyes seem a little glossy. Take a moment if you want.
So… that trailer was fifteen sorts of fantastic. I’m not even completely certain of what I was watching or how it would translate to the controller in my hands once it — finally — releases to long, long waiting masses. But I know whatever that trailer was showing, I want it. And I want it bad.
Got some news to chase this gameplay down with. Tetsuya Nomura, FFXV's director since the game was announced two-thousand years ago as Final Fantasy Versus XIII, is relinquishing the Head Honcho seat amidst Square Enix’s strategic staff switcheroo.
Now, a Mr. Hajime Tabata is tasked with carrying XV to gold status. Tabata’s directorial credits include that nifty FFVII spin-off Crisis Core and its fellow PSP comrade Final Fantasy Type-0. Bringing this shit full circle, Type-0's HD re-release for PS4 and Xbox One is set to be packaged with a demo for Final Fantasy XV. Yeah, it’s actually happening. We live in a reality where XV will be playable. Type-0 is on shelves as soon as March 17, 2015.
Oh, and fret not for Nomura-san. Square’s putting him to work right away. He’ll be overseeing projects “that can only be made possible by Nomura himself,” starting with none other than finishing Kingdom Hearts III.
Mountains are being moved around at Square Enix. The impossible being made possible. Fans have waited nearly a day shy of eternity for these two games. But, oddly, the more tangible these games get, the harder the wait becomes.

Final Fantasy XV Still Exists, Trailer Reminds Us of the Pain of Not Owning It

Stop reading. Watch this.

You back? Your eyes seem a little glossy. Take a moment if you want.

So… that trailer was fifteen sorts of fantastic. I’m not even completely certain of what I was watching or how it would translate to the controller in my hands once it — finally — releases to long, long waiting masses. But I know whatever that trailer was showing, I want it. And I want it bad.

Got some news to chase this gameplay down with. Tetsuya Nomura, FFXV's director since the game was announced two-thousand years ago as Final Fantasy Versus XIII, is relinquishing the Head Honcho seat amidst Square Enix’s strategic staff switcheroo.

Now, a Mr. Hajime Tabata is tasked with carrying XV to gold status. Tabata’s directorial credits include that nifty FFVII spin-off Crisis Core and its fellow PSP comrade Final Fantasy Type-0. Bringing this shit full circle, Type-0's HD re-release for PS4 and Xbox One is set to be packaged with a demo for Final Fantasy XV. Yeah, it’s actually happening. We live in a reality where XV will be playable. Type-0 is on shelves as soon as March 17, 2015.

Oh, and fret not for Nomura-san. Square’s putting him to work right away. He’ll be overseeing projects “that can only be made possible by Nomura himself,” starting with none other than finishing Kingdom Hearts III.

Mountains are being moved around at Square Enix. The impossible being made possible. Fans have waited nearly a day shy of eternity for these two games. But, oddly, the more tangible these games get, the harder the wait becomes.

+ Chocobo and Moogle Love
by hinoraito

Chocobo and Moogle Love

by hinoraito

+ Sony’s Selling All of its Square Enix Shares to Return to Profitability
But, hey, the PlayStation 4 is still killing it
Japanese juggernaut Sony, most famous for the globally known PlayStation brand — and for also making, I don’t know, headphones and a few movies now and again — is dumping its entire financial stake out of publisher Square Enix.
Sony holds 9.52 million shares in Square Enix, a sensual tryst that began in the early 2000’s. Once upon a time ago, before the word “timed” preceded “exclusivity,” Square’s Final Fantasy brand was nearly synonymous with PlayStation, especially helping Sony claim the dominance in Japanese households it still enjoys to this very day.
Sony’s equity is priced at ¥4.8 billion yen, or $47 million. The deal is expected to be closed as soon as tomorrow. The decision is the next of several moves the company has made to return itself to profitability. Since 2014 began, Sony has laid off thousands of workers, sold two corporate offices, and has even axed its PC division.
On the upside, the Sony PlayStation 4 has reveled in sales success, having sold 7 million units worldwide since launch, surpassing its next-gen competition, the Xbox One, by a slim margin. As an aside, I am currently a happy member of that 7 million club and I sing my PS4 into a gentle sleep, nightly.

Sony’s Selling All of its Square Enix Shares to Return to Profitability

But, hey, the PlayStation 4 is still killing it

Japanese juggernaut Sony, most famous for the globally known PlayStation brand — and for also making, I don’t know, headphones and a few movies now and again — is dumping its entire financial stake out of publisher Square Enix.

Sony holds 9.52 million shares in Square Enix, a sensual tryst that began in the early 2000’s. Once upon a time ago, before the word “timed” preceded “exclusivity,” Square’s Final Fantasy brand was nearly synonymous with PlayStation, especially helping Sony claim the dominance in Japanese households it still enjoys to this very day.

Sony’s equity is priced at ¥4.8 billion yen, or $47 million. The deal is expected to be closed as soon as tomorrow. The decision is the next of several moves the company has made to return itself to profitability. Since 2014 began, Sony has laid off thousands of workers, sold two corporate offices, and has even axed its PC division.

On the upside, the Sony PlayStation 4 has reveled in sales success, having sold 7 million units worldwide since launch, surpassing its next-gen competition, the Xbox One, by a slim margin. As an aside, I am currently a happy member of that 7 million club and I sing my PS4 into a gentle sleep, nightly.

Final Fantasy XV - TGS Trailer

Does returning Final Fantasy to its former throne mean ditching its turn-based legacy? The few glimpses we’ve gotten into the reformulated Versus XIII — now promoted to a main series title — has been stupidly impressive.

Final Fantasy always had a breathtaking scope about it, but the view just went panoramic. It’s like Square Enix finally decided to let the player take part in all the meticulously crafted action set pieces from its cutscenes. But will hardcore fans accept their fabled JRPG’s transition into Action RPG?

We got a ways to go before that answer emerges. Until then…I’m gonna watch this trailer again.

+ Black Mage by Joonas Lantta

Black Mage by Joonas Lantta

The Red Herb Roundup: The Big Goddamn PlayStation 4 Edition

image

So something rather intriguing happened this week.  It would appear this new fangled “next-gen” officially kicked off.  Well, unless you count the Wii U next-gen, which you’re completely allowed to (inversely, I get to call you wrong).  That’s right, Sony finally ripped off the wraps on the PlayStation 4.  Fast, socially integrated, the ability to stream games, two separate cup-holders — Sony’s future proofing their brand and the attempt is, surprisingly, not a laughable disaster.

You can find my initial reaction to the hardware’s specs hereabouts, but we’re dialing back the technophilia today and also focusing on something more important than even a brand new, highfalutin’, Facebookin’ console: the games.

Hit the jump to check out what’s in store for gamers next generation; a generation right around the corner.  Oh, and welcome back to the Roundup.

Continue reading...

+ Lightning by Reza Kabir

Lightning by Reza Kabir

+ Lightning Returns "Unique Enough" to Drop the XIII-3 Name
A branching of stories within the Final Fantasy games — referred to as the ‘Lightning Saga’ — comes to a close next year, forming the franchise’s first full-fledged trilogy.  Despite beginning with Final Fantasy XIII and carrying on to, naturally, Final Fantasy XIII-2, the final chapter shutting the curtains on this saga forgoes the logical, if unimaginative, next step numbering of XIII-3.
Given that Final Fantasy: Lightning Returns is projected for the tail end of 2013, I’d expect even the shittiest basement dwelling ad agency to go nuts with the coincidence and drill XIII-3 in ‘13 squarely into gamer’s heads.  But in explaining why Lightning Returns shirks the numbering scheme in an interview with 4gamer, the game’s creators have shared insights on just how different of a beast this finale is from previous entries.
Yoshinori Kitase, the game’s producer, says the game is, put simply, a “new experience.”  Calling it XIII-3 would already put the incorrect suggestion into fans’ minds that this sequel’s gameplay launches off of XIII-2's conceits.  Motomu Toriyama, tasked with directorial duties, breaks down each installment as such: the original XIII, at its foundation, was story driven, while XIII-2 opted for a more player driven approach.  Lightning Returns revolves around the notion that the game is “world driven,” where the world environment runs in real-time, “24 hours a day” and is dramatically “changing and shifting” whether the player is there to experience it or not.
This design element both instills a sense of urgency in players to seek out events and happenings before they play out without them while also promoting serious amounts of replay value, where going about subsequent playthroughs differently rewards you with new content each time.  Slaying monsters or performing miracles (whatever the hell that means; slaying monsters sounds tiring as it is) impacts the flow of time — which is constantly ticking down till doomsday — by either speeding it up or slowing it down.  This mechanic plays into the “risk versus reward” nature of the game.
Every little shred of information I hear about this game — and we’re talking very little shreds considering the game’s August announcement — absolutely fascinates me.  There was a time in my gaming life when a Final Fantasy release meant that nothing besides a Squaresoft emblazoned disc would be spinning in my drive for weeks straight.  XIII brought with it a decidedly mixed era for the franchise, but from what I’m hearing, Lightning’s Saga is attempting to end on a high note.

Lightning Returns "Unique Enough" to Drop the XIII-3 Name

A branching of stories within the Final Fantasy games — referred to as the ‘Lightning Saga’ — comes to a close next year, forming the franchise’s first full-fledged trilogy.  Despite beginning with Final Fantasy XIII and carrying on to, naturally, Final Fantasy XIII-2, the final chapter shutting the curtains on this saga forgoes the logical, if unimaginative, next step numbering of XIII-3.

Given that Final Fantasy: Lightning Returns is projected for the tail end of 2013, I’d expect even the shittiest basement dwelling ad agency to go nuts with the coincidence and drill XIII-3 in ‘13 squarely into gamer’s heads.  But in explaining why Lightning Returns shirks the numbering scheme in an interview with 4gamer, the game’s creators have shared insights on just how different of a beast this finale is from previous entries.

Yoshinori Kitase, the game’s producer, says the game is, put simply, a “new experience.”  Calling it XIII-3 would already put the incorrect suggestion into fans’ minds that this sequel’s gameplay launches off of XIII-2's conceits.  Motomu Toriyama, tasked with directorial duties, breaks down each installment as such: the original XIII, at its foundation, was story driven, while XIII-2 opted for a more player driven approach.  Lightning Returns revolves around the notion that the game is “world driven,” where the world environment runs in real-time, “24 hours a day” and is dramatically “changing and shifting” whether the player is there to experience it or not.

This design element both instills a sense of urgency in players to seek out events and happenings before they play out without them while also promoting serious amounts of replay value, where going about subsequent playthroughs differently rewards you with new content each time.  Slaying monsters or performing miracles (whatever the hell that means; slaying monsters sounds tiring as it is) impacts the flow of time — which is constantly ticking down till doomsday — by either speeding it up or slowing it down.  This mechanic plays into the “risk versus reward” nature of the game.

Every little shred of information I hear about this game — and we’re talking very little shreds considering the game’s August announcement — absolutely fascinates me.  There was a time in my gaming life when a Final Fantasy release meant that nothing besides a Squaresoft emblazoned disc would be spinning in my drive for weeks straight.  XIII brought with it a decidedly mixed era for the franchise, but from what I’m hearing, Lightning’s Saga is attempting to end on a high note.

+ Vivi Orunitia by Steven Donegani

Vivi Orunitia by Steven Donegani

Square Enix Announces Lightning Returns for 2013

The Final Fantasy XIII saga is coming to a close next year and Lightning is back as your sole character in this third and final entry.  Set hundreds of years after the events of XIII-2, Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII pits our titular heroine in the middle of a new world called Novus Partus — a locale said to contrast against the previous two installments’ gloss and sheen, opting for a more mechanical, gothic backdrop.

Following the darker shift in atmosphere, Lightning races against an in-game clock counting down to the end of the world — a mere thirteen days after you begin the adventure.  Gameplay makes use of this Majora’s Mask staple in such instances as being able to barter a re-do of a failed battle for a chunk of your precious time.  Similarly, more powerful attacks can be traded for shaved time.  Also markedly changed is the combat system, now retooled with a heavier emphasis on controlling Lightning in real-time.  Not only will players be tasked with managing Lightning’s movement and attacks, but blocking has been added to her skill set, forcing players to perfect their timing and keep a keener eye on enemies.

Despite its high points (and its signature, unparallelled visuals), the XIII branch of the Final Fantasy vine has found ways to disappoint the ten-year-old kid inside of me that first discovered these spectacular worlds back in the PS1 days.  Yet these early, broad ideas stemming forth have reignited my interest.  This “XIII-3" may not be out to satisfy the level-grinding me from my formative RPGin’ years, but it doesn’t have to.  It’s playing to its own strengths, and what I’m hearing sounds pretty damn intriguing for a Final Fantasy game.

While Lightning Returns just began life at the beginning of August, Square still projects a 2013 release for the game on both the PS3 and Xbox 360.

+ Checkers by Jack Moureau

Checkers by Jack Moureau

+ Final Fantasy XIV is ‘A Realm Reborn’
If you’re one of the few participants to jump onto Square Enix’s second MMO within the Final Fantasy series when it released way back in September of 2010, you may have noticed something awfully suspicious: the game sucked.
Final Fantasy XIV sucked so much that it even derailed the PS3 port’s release from March of 2011 to “eventually” (“eventually” in this case meaning “when the game stops being terrible”).  Looking to rectify the product’s wrongdoings — and recapture some of the surprise success that made fellow MMO FFXI the most profitable title in the franchise — Square promised a full-on restructuring of the game, tentatively called 2.0.
Now, the efforts behind 2.0 have come to be, rebranded as Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn.  The update is a massive undertaking that, to name a few fixes, alters the battle regimen, introduces a new map system, adds new client software, and includes an additional graphics engine.  A Realm Reborn marks a very apparent shift for FFXIV; so much so that it almost seems like a different game altogether, one certainly more suited for the Final Fantasy name.
Alpha testing for A Realm Reborn is scheduled for September with a not-quite-solid Winter release in mind for the final build.  And, Sony fans, I know you’ve been waiting patiently and politely through this article so here’s your feel good of the day: Square Enix has remarked that that FFXIV port sitting on the back burner will drop for the PS3 sometime after the PC version’s humungous update, and it will certainly reflect all of the additions A Realm Reborn claims stake to.
Ah, Versus XIII isn’t dead, XIV Online will stop sucking soon…Things are looking up, Final Fantasy fans — Hmm?  You want them to remake VII?  Listen, fixing a crappy game is already like moving a mountain.  Remaking one of the most critically acclaimed games of all time, a title so revered that many already consider it to be perfect?  Bigger mountain.

Final Fantasy XIV is ‘A Realm Reborn

If you’re one of the few participants to jump onto Square Enix’s second MMO within the Final Fantasy series when it released way back in September of 2010, you may have noticed something awfully suspicious: the game sucked.

Final Fantasy XIV sucked so much that it even derailed the PS3 port’s release from March of 2011 to “eventually” (“eventually” in this case meaning “when the game stops being terrible”).  Looking to rectify the product’s wrongdoings — and recapture some of the surprise success that made fellow MMO FFXI the most profitable title in the franchise — Square promised a full-on restructuring of the game, tentatively called 2.0.

Now, the efforts behind 2.0 have come to be, rebranded as Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn.  The update is a massive undertaking that, to name a few fixes, alters the battle regimen, introduces a new map system, adds new client software, and includes an additional graphics engine.  A Realm Reborn marks a very apparent shift for FFXIV; so much so that it almost seems like a different game altogether, one certainly more suited for the Final Fantasy name.

Alpha testing for A Realm Reborn is scheduled for September with a not-quite-solid Winter release in mind for the final build.  And, Sony fans, I know you’ve been waiting patiently and politely through this article so here’s your feel good of the day: Square Enix has remarked that that FFXIV port sitting on the back burner will drop for the PS3 sometime after the PC version’s humungous update, and it will certainly reflect all of the additions A Realm Reborn claims stake to.

Ah, Versus XIII isn’t dead, XIV Online will stop sucking soon…Things are looking up, Final Fantasy fans — Hmm?  You want them to remake VII?  Listen, fixing a crappy game is already like moving a mountain.  Remaking one of the most critically acclaimed games of all time, a title so revered that many already consider it to be perfect?  Bigger mountain.

+ Final Fantasy Versus XIII: Totally Not Cancelled
The bitter stew that is internet rage hit boiling point when Kotaku reported that an anonymous source tipped them off about Versus XIII being shit-canned.  The continued absence of the title from several major gaming expos paired with a — so far — six year development span was enough to convince the press and fans alike that the rumor was true.
But who better to squash a vicious, nearly sentient rumor than Square Enix, the game’s publisher and financer?  The company’s president, Yoichi Wada, took to Twitter (a veritable spring of information for people that are quick to fire “tl;dr” at anything and everything), and outright confirmed Versus XIII was alive, kicking, and well into production.  “Just a minute ago, the regular Versus meeting ended. If you saw the presentation of the city, it’d knock you off your feet,” Tweets Wada, after laughing off the damnable rumor.
Well, this series certainly dodged a bullet.  If you’re a casual spectator and are curious, mayhaps even confused, as to why you heard a dull roar the moment this very spin-offy sounding title flashed a red warning light, then I’ll try to be brief: Final Fantasy Versus XIII has smacked of ambition the moment it was announced.  Straying away from the more traditional aspects you’d find in this RPG franchise, Versus roots its gameplay in a freer, more realistic style that harkens to Kingdom Hearts to a degree but draws inspiration from other titles like Mass Effect both graphically and in how you interact with the world and its inhabitants.
And unlike its forefathers, Versus looks to put unprecedented control (for an RPG) right in your hands.  Battles unfold in real-time and don’t take place in confined spaces — you’ll fight in the streets, on rooftops, anywhere you can get hit.  Plus, the whole package — or what we’ve briefly seen of it — is visually astounding, evoking comparisons to Square’s CG films more so than any of games carrying the XIII moniker.  It’s a major shift in direction and a bold gamble for a series that has grown especially stale this generation.
Square Enix swears they have something special cooking for September 1st’s Final Fantasy 25th Anniversary presentation.  Even if a bare minimum is shown or announced there, new rumors have it that the Tokyo Game Show exhibition taking place at the end of that month may be our first satisfying Versus blowout.  Time will tell.  I’m simply stoked this project isn’t dead.

Final Fantasy Versus XIII: Totally Not Cancelled

The bitter stew that is internet rage hit boiling point when Kotaku reported that an anonymous source tipped them off about Versus XIII being shit-canned.  The continued absence of the title from several major gaming expos paired with a — so far — six year development span was enough to convince the press and fans alike that the rumor was true.

But who better to squash a vicious, nearly sentient rumor than Square Enix, the game’s publisher and financer?  The company’s president, Yoichi Wada, took to Twitter (a veritable spring of information for people that are quick to fire “tl;dr” at anything and everything), and outright confirmed Versus XIII was alive, kicking, and well into production.  “Just a minute ago, the regular Versus meeting ended. If you saw the presentation of the city, it’d knock you off your feet,” Tweets Wada, after laughing off the damnable rumor.

Well, this series certainly dodged a bullet.  If you’re a casual spectator and are curious, mayhaps even confused, as to why you heard a dull roar the moment this very spin-offy sounding title flashed a red warning light, then I’ll try to be brief: Final Fantasy Versus XIII has smacked of ambition the moment it was announced.  Straying away from the more traditional aspects you’d find in this RPG franchise, Versus roots its gameplay in a freer, more realistic style that harkens to Kingdom Hearts to a degree but draws inspiration from other titles like Mass Effect both graphically and in how you interact with the world and its inhabitants.

And unlike its forefathers, Versus looks to put unprecedented control (for an RPG) right in your hands.  Battles unfold in real-time and don’t take place in confined spaces — you’ll fight in the streets, on rooftops, anywhere you can get hit.  Plus, the whole package — or what we’ve briefly seen of it — is visually astounding, evoking comparisons to Square’s CG films more so than any of games carrying the XIII moniker.  It’s a major shift in direction and a bold gamble for a series that has grown especially stale this generation.

Square Enix swears they have something special cooking for September 1st’s Final Fantasy 25th Anniversary presentation.  Even if a bare minimum is shown or announced there, new rumors have it that the Tokyo Game Show exhibition taking place at the end of that month may be our first satisfying Versus blowout.  Time will tell.  I’m simply stoked this project isn’t dead.