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Posts tagged resident evil.
+ Resident Evil Revelations 2 Leaked By Xbox; Features Spooky Prison Setting
How friggin’ joyous. I get to report on Resident Evil news twice in the same month? It’s not every day your reason for being is fulfilled… I may have revealed too much about myself, sure. Let’s pretend tattered RE posters from old Prima guides aren’t adorning every wall in my apartment and move on to the haps.
Gamer in a Box, France’s best worst named gaming site, caught wise to Xbox.com hosting two interestin’ images — one being the concept art above of a prison fallen into disrepair and the following:

Though I’ve no formal training in investigative reporting, I’d still caution a guess that the box art shown is an extremely subtle clue Capcom is planning on sequelizing the well-received Resident Evil Revelations.
I know. This whole “Biohazard" business can be confusing. That’s actually the original Japanese name given to the series. It was changed for North American release to Resident Evil in order to protect the intellectual rights of this band. If it weren’t for nu-metal, Resident Evil might have a title that didn’t stop making sense after the first game. This fun sidebar on nu-metal making the world a slightly worse place was provided to by the complete lack of solid information I have to give to you guys.
Revelations 2 rumors kicked up earlier in the year featuring too-fuckin’-good-to-be-true details like the return of Claire Redfield. More recently, new rumblings suggested that, though the spin-off began its life on the 3DS, the sequel would only appear on Xbox 360 and PS3 as well as the PS4 and Xbone.
Cat’s outta of the bag now. Just a matter of time before we get to see what Capcom’s up to.

Resident Evil Revelations 2 Leaked By Xbox; Features Spooky Prison Setting

How friggin’ joyous. I get to report on Resident Evil news twice in the same month? It’s not every day your reason for being is fulfilled… I may have revealed too much about myself, sure. Let’s pretend tattered RE posters from old Prima guides aren’t adorning every wall in my apartment and move on to the haps.

Gamer in a Box, France’s best worst named gaming site, caught wise to Xbox.com hosting two interestin’ images — one being the concept art above of a prison fallen into disrepair and the following:

Though I’ve no formal training in investigative reporting, I’d still caution a guess that the box art shown is an extremely subtle clue Capcom is planning on sequelizing the well-received Resident Evil Revelations.

I know. This whole “Biohazard" business can be confusing. That’s actually the original Japanese name given to the series. It was changed for North American release to Resident Evil in order to protect the intellectual rights of this band. If it weren’t for nu-metal, Resident Evil might have a title that didn’t stop making sense after the first game. This fun sidebar on nu-metal making the world a slightly worse place was provided to by the complete lack of solid information I have to give to you guys.

Revelations 2 rumors kicked up earlier in the year featuring too-fuckin’-good-to-be-true details like the return of Claire Redfield. More recently, new rumblings suggested that, though the spin-off began its life on the 3DS, the sequel would only appear on Xbox 360 and PS3 as well as the PS4 and Xbone.

Cat’s outta of the bag now. Just a matter of time before we get to see what Capcom’s up to.

Resident Evil's Sublime Remake is Being Revived for Current and Next-Gen

In 2002, the Nintendo Gamecube of all systems saw a resurrected and reconfigured version of one the greatest titles that helped define the survival horror genre.

Rather than stray away from the core values of the ‘96 classic, this new Resident Evil improved upon them — the game was made grislier, the atmosphere was darker, and the difficulty was even harder than the original. If you wanted to experience the S.T.A.R.S. team’s first disastrous mission, REmake (the name fans coined) quickly became the preferred vessel to do so. Despite this, it didn’t sell worth a shit stuck on Nintendo’s purple purse.

Now, Capcom has revived the underrated classic for the HD generation. Set for release in early 2015 as a digital download, this ragged chunk of RE history will be made available on PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, and Xbox One. The game’s visuals — from our hapless heroes to the dilapidated Spencer Estate — have been bolstered by an upgraded resolution and 3D models. The game even runs at 1080p on next-gen systems.

The creaking wood floors, the skin-crawling soundtrack, and the bone-crunching noise that comes along with making Jill Sandwiches are all retouched in 5.1 Surround Sound. The game can be played in the original 4:3 aspect ratio or enjoyed in a brand new widescreen mode (flat-screens were less common in 2002, if you recall).

The series famous tank controls return as a default, and you can bet your ass I’ll struggle through them like a champion, but if you bewilderingly dislike fighting the controller you’ll be glad to know a new “Push To Go” control scheme is being implemented. You can toggle between both during gameplay in case you youngin’s want to see how hard us old men had it back in the day.

+ pixalry:

Resident Evil 3 - Created by Marco D’Alfonso | Tumblr
Part of the 8-Bit & Beyond 2 Art Show opening August 8th at Bottleneck Gallery.

Do your part. Tear bio-weapons apart!

pixalry:

Resident Evil 3 - Created by Marco D’Alfonso | Tumblr

Part of the 8-Bit & Beyond 2 Art Show opening August 8th at Bottleneck Gallery.

Do your part. Tear bio-weapons apart!

Sometimes I can’t put into words why Resident Evil 2 is my favorite game of all time.

Sometimes I can’t put into words why Resident Evil 2 is my favorite game of all time.

+ galaxynextdoor:

Resident Evil by Marinko Milosevski

This belongs in a museum!

galaxynextdoor:

Resident Evil by Marinko Milosevski

This belongs in a museum!

kevinapocalypse:

But goddamn could the man take a rocket to the face.

kevinapocalypse:

But goddamn could the man take a rocket to the face.

n64thstreet:

The DeLorean DMC-12 hidden in Resident Evil 2, by Capcom.

The things I love always come full circle.

n64thstreet:

The DeLorean DMC-12 hidden in Resident Evil 2, by Capcom.

The things I love always come full circle.

+ "I’ve been thinking something’s wrong with this house…"
by Edgard Oliva

"I’ve been thinking something’s wrong with this house…"

by Edgard Oliva

+ cracked:

We’ve got two Resident Evil t-shirt designs, and we can only make one. Go vote on Cracked today to decide the t-virus-outracing shirt of tomorrow.

cracked:

We’ve got two Resident Evil t-shirt designs, and we can only make one. Go vote on Cracked today to decide the t-virus-outracing shirt of tomorrow.

+ Fan Project Resurrects Resident Evil: Outbreak's Dead Online
Sometimes I have to marvel at fans’ tenacity.
Though marching toward a full decade since its release two whole console generations ago on the PS2 — the Former Champion of the World, as you may well remember — fans of the highly experimental and hopelessly ahead of its time spin-off, Resident Evil: Outbreak, are not content to let the dead lie.
If you don’t recall this obscurity, Outbreak File #1 and its “sequel”/expansion File #2 took the traditional, fixed-perspective scares of the pre-Resi 4 titles and created a scenario-based, cooperatively online game — Resident Evil's first foray into the online space.
Outbreak featured a bunch of cool ideas that you know Capcom’s teams have been wanting to toss into the games for years. Pitting you and a handful of other survivors in the ongoing ruination of Raccoon City, the game was a meaner, more survivalist focused experience that forced item management, combat tactics, and even environmental defense onto your group lest you all faced the business end of a horrible, T-Virus induced death. Fight alone and you die alone.
The series did not persist. A number of staggering design flaws made sure Outbreak would begin and end at cult status (without the PS2’s HDD the game didn’t just have loading times, it had goddamn loading eras). This wasn’t helped by Sony’s admirable but lackluster first try at console-only online.
The servers, of course, have long been shut down. But one group of survival horror activists said, “To fuck with that noise.” Enter the Outbreak Server Recreation Project. Through the magic of the project’s custom servers, you’re able to actually play online with both File #1 and File #2… if you own the Japanese versions of the games, that is (emulators also work, but aren’t condoned by the group, mind you).
If you’re like me, Operation Raccoon City didn’t scratch that Outbreak itch (personally, it just bruised the area around the itch, then pissed on it… to heal the bruising?). Perhaps this attention, albeit small, may plant the notion in a Capcom exec’s head to kick around the Outbreak IP once more. Imagine what today’s tech could do with this concept. With the popularity of similarly themed games like DayZ and State of Decay, a modern day restart of Outbreak starts to click.
Ah, wishful thinking. We may have to settle for our nostalgia. But at least you can take that nostalgia online again.

Fan Project Resurrects Resident Evil: Outbreak's Dead Online

Sometimes I have to marvel at fans’ tenacity.

Though marching toward a full decade since its release two whole console generations ago on the PS2 — the Former Champion of the World, as you may well remember — fans of the highly experimental and hopelessly ahead of its time spin-off, Resident Evil: Outbreak, are not content to let the dead lie.

If you don’t recall this obscurity, Outbreak File #1 and its “sequel”/expansion File #2 took the traditional, fixed-perspective scares of the pre-Resi 4 titles and created a scenario-based, cooperatively online game — Resident Evil's first foray into the online space.

Outbreak featured a bunch of cool ideas that you know Capcom’s teams have been wanting to toss into the games for years. Pitting you and a handful of other survivors in the ongoing ruination of Raccoon City, the game was a meaner, more survivalist focused experience that forced item management, combat tactics, and even environmental defense onto your group lest you all faced the business end of a horrible, T-Virus induced death. Fight alone and you die alone.

The series did not persist. A number of staggering design flaws made sure Outbreak would begin and end at cult status (without the PS2’s HDD the game didn’t just have loading times, it had goddamn loading eras). This wasn’t helped by Sony’s admirable but lackluster first try at console-only online.

The servers, of course, have long been shut down. But one group of survival horror activists said, “To fuck with that noise.” Enter the Outbreak Server Recreation Project. Through the magic of the project’s custom servers, you’re able to actually play online with both File #1 and File #2… if you own the Japanese versions of the games, that is (emulators also work, but aren’t condoned by the group, mind you).

If you’re like me, Operation Raccoon City didn’t scratch that Outbreak itch (personally, it just bruised the area around the itch, then pissed on it… to heal the bruising?). Perhaps this attention, albeit small, may plant the notion in a Capcom exec’s head to kick around the Outbreak IP once more. Imagine what today’s tech could do with this concept. With the popularity of similarly themed games like DayZ and State of Decay, a modern day restart of Outbreak starts to click.

Ah, wishful thinking. We may have to settle for our nostalgia. But at least you can take that nostalgia online again.

+ Resident Evil: Code Veronica by Darkdux
As @RE_Games points out, Code: Veronica takes place in December 1998. Here’s some sweet fan art to pay respects to an off-kilter but beloved entry to the series.

Resident Evil: Code Veronica by Darkdux

As @RE_Games points out, Code: Veronica takes place in December 1998. Here’s some sweet fan art to pay respects to an off-kilter but beloved entry to the series.

+ The Father of Survival Horror Wants to Bring Scary Back
Shinji Mikami, the Japanese game designer heralded as The Father of Survival Horror since unleashing Resident Evil unto the world in 1996, says gamers are too inured against being scared these days.
"Not much has changed when it comes to instilling terror in the player," Mikami said, talking up Edge Online at this year’s Tokyo Game Show. “But people have got used to the tropes of horror and they know what’s coming next, so in that sense it is harder to make them afraid.”
Shinji and his newly constructed team at Tango Gameworks are sure as shit going to try to rattle your nerves, though. Their vessel is the promising, tensely atmospheric The Evil Within — a new survival horror game steeped in classic scares. According to Mikami, it’s not about reinventing the genre; it’s about digging up its roots and latching on to what worked in the first place.
Constant gunplay, sporadic Quick-Time-Events, mindless action — what’s become routine in modern horror games the likes of Dead Space and, sadly, current Resident Evil installments are being done away with in The Evil Within. Contrary to this generation’s teachings, survival relies on far more than a loaded gun.
"The scariest parts will be when you encounter enemies that cannot be killed with a gun," says Mikami. Instead, you’ll have to use your environment and quick thinking to trap chainsaw swinging freaks lest you’re looking to lose a few feet above your shoulders.
When Bethesda, Tango’s parent company, initially announced the horror title (under the name Zwei), Shinji stated it would be his last directorial effort. A year later and the designer, thankfully, has changed his tune.
“I don’t think I’ll ever completely stop doing creative work,” he said. “We’re a studio that makes things, and that means we need a leader who also makes things. So I don’t think I’ll be taking my hands off the wheel completely. I want to give younger staff the chance to make games – that’s something I’m very passionate about – but I’m not sick of making games or anything. I want to continue in a creative role. That will never change.”

The Father of Survival Horror Wants to Bring Scary Back

Shinji Mikami, the Japanese game designer heralded as The Father of Survival Horror since unleashing Resident Evil unto the world in 1996, says gamers are too inured against being scared these days.

"Not much has changed when it comes to instilling terror in the player," Mikami said, talking up Edge Online at this year’s Tokyo Game Show. “But people have got used to the tropes of horror and they know what’s coming next, so in that sense it is harder to make them afraid.”

Shinji and his newly constructed team at Tango Gameworks are sure as shit going to try to rattle your nerves, though. Their vessel is the promising, tensely atmospheric The Evil Within — a new survival horror game steeped in classic scares. According to Mikami, it’s not about reinventing the genre; it’s about digging up its roots and latching on to what worked in the first place.

Constant gunplay, sporadic Quick-Time-Events, mindless action — what’s become routine in modern horror games the likes of Dead Space and, sadly, current Resident Evil installments are being done away with in The Evil Within. Contrary to this generation’s teachings, survival relies on far more than a loaded gun.

"The scariest parts will be when you encounter enemies that cannot be killed with a gun," says Mikami. Instead, you’ll have to use your environment and quick thinking to trap chainsaw swinging freaks lest you’re looking to lose a few feet above your shoulders.

When Bethesda, Tango’s parent company, initially announced the horror title (under the name Zwei), Shinji stated it would be his last directorial effort. A year later and the designer, thankfully, has changed his tune.

“I don’t think I’ll ever completely stop doing creative work,” he said. “We’re a studio that makes things, and that means we need a leader who also makes things. So I don’t think I’ll be taking my hands off the wheel completely. I want to give younger staff the chance to make games – that’s something I’m very passionate about – but I’m not sick of making games or anything. I want to continue in a creative role. That will never change.”

+ insertquarterbin:

ALL NEW IQB! “House of S.T.A.A.A.A.R.R.R.R.R.S.S.S.S.” - Based off of House of Secrets #92 by Bernie Wrightson. Artwork and concept by your pal Rusty Shackles.  
Please check out all of the existing IQB’s via the archive, ALL of the IQBs shown are available as prints here.  Please tell your friends about this project, the more the merrier!  Back Issue in 2 weeks!  Thanks for playing, true believers!

insertquarterbin:

ALL NEW IQB! “House of S.T.A.A.A.A.R.R.R.R.R.S.S.S.S.” - Based off of House of Secrets #92 by Bernie Wrightson. Artwork and concept by your pal Rusty Shackles.  

Please check out all of the existing IQB’s via the archive, ALL of the IQBs shown are available as prints here.  Please tell your friends about this project, the more the merrier!  Back Issue in 2 weeks!  Thanks for playing, true believers!

+ theomeganerd:

Resident Evil 6 Anniversary
High Res

They all seem visibly upset. Stay off Metacritic, guys.

theomeganerd:

Resident Evil 6 Anniversary

High Res

They all seem visibly upset. Stay off Metacritic, guys.